Let’s Compare Classic ( Donkey Kong )

LINK TO OPENING MUSIC !

Arcade 0:22
Atari 2600 1:12
ZX Spectrum 1:49
MSX 2:33
Atari 800 3:17
Intellivision 3:49
Amstrad CPC 4:22
TI99 5:18
Amiga 6:09
Commodore ( Nintendo Version ) 6:54
Commodore 64 ( Ocean Version ) 7:48
Colecovision 8:39
Colecovision ( Opcode Games ) 9:15
DOS ( Donkey Kong PC ) 9:54
Gameboy 10:32
Atari 7800 11:21
FLASH 11:55
NES 12:40
Coleco table top ( emulated ) 13:22
Creds 14:06

Song: Donkey Kong Remix
By: Deryl Wingate
www.youtube.com/user/DerylWingate

Check this guys channel out ! He has some wicked beats Here Amazing work & an
Awesome Channel !

Atari 800 footage provided by cryinglion

www.youtube.com/user/cryinglion

Description Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donkey_Kong_%28video_game%29

Donkey Kong (???????, Donki Kongu?) is an arcade game developed by Nintendo, released in 1981. It is an early example of the platform game genre, as the gameplay focuses on maneuvering the main character across a series of platforms while dodging and jumping over obstacles. In it, Jumpman (now known as Mario) must rescue a damsel in distress, Lady (now known as Pauline), from a giant ape named Donkey Kong. The hero and ape later became two of Nintendo’s most popular characters.

The game was the latest in a series of efforts by Nintendo to break into the North American market. Hiroshi Yamauchi, Nintendo’s president at the time, assigned the project to a first-time game designer named Shigeru Miyamoto. Drawing from a wide range of inspirations, including Popeye and King Kong, Miyamoto developed the scenario and designed the game alongside Nintendo’s chief engineer, Gunpei Yokoi. The two men broke new ground by using graphics as a means of characterization, including cut scenes to advance the game’s plot, and integrating multiple stages into the gameplay.

Despite initial misgivings on the part of Nintendo’s American staff, Donkey Kong proved a success in North America and Japan. Nintendo licensed the game to Coleco, who developed home console versions for numerous platforms. Other companies cloned Nintendo’s hit and avoided royalties altogether. Miyamoto’s characters appeared on cereal boxes, television cartoons, and dozens of other places. A court suit brought on by Universal City Studios, alleging Donkey Kong violated their trademark of King Kong, ultimately failed. The success of Donkey Kong and Nintendo’s win in the courtroom helped position the company to dominate the video game market in the 1980s and early 1990s.

Gameplay:

Donkey Kong is one of the earliest examples of the platform game genre; it is sometimes said to be the first platform game, although it was preceded by Space Panic.[2] In contrast to Space Panic, however, Donkey Kong was the first platform game to feature jumping,[3] introducing the need to jump between gaps and over obstacles or approaching enemies, setting the template for the platform genre.[4] Competitive video gamers and referees stress the game’s high level of difficulty compared to other classic arcade games. Winning the game requires patience and the ability to accurately time Jumpman’s ascent.[5] In addition to presenting the goal of saving the Lady, the game also gives the player a score. Points are awarded for finishing screens; leaping over obstacles; destroying objects with a hammer power-up; collecting items such as hats, parasols, and purses (presumably belonging to the Lady/Pauline); and completing other tasks. The player typically receives three lives with a bonus awarded for the first 10,000 points,[6] although this can be modified via the game’s built in DIP switches.

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